Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Jeopardy for Review

I am sending along an lesson plan and article to review that a teacher wrote explaining her procedure and purpose for using a PowerPoint Jeopardy game to help students review course material. She claims that the use of the game helped students improve their performance and understanding of course concepts significantly compared to students in former classes who did use the review method. You will notice how she arranged the lesson plan with the students creating the game, truly creating a constructivist approach to education. Check out her plan, and let us know what you think. As some of you consider your own teaching, how can using PowerPoint to create games, Jeopardy or other games, be used to make learning interactive, participatory, and hands-on, appealing to a variety of learning styles? Here is the link to the article: http://oncourseworkshop.com/Learning043.htm

15 comments:

Carla said...

I think this is a great idea and a wonderful tool for students. I just used an original PowerPoint to review a chapter with my students today (the one I showed in class last week) and they were much more motivated then in the past. I truly think they enjoyed it. We'll wait to see how Monday's test goes for them. In regard to having them create the questions I think that's a fabulous idea. What a great way to allow students to take leadership roles in the classroom and to take ownership of their own learning. I will definitely try that next time.

travis said...

Yes, I will have to agree with Carla. This is a wonderful tool to use in a classroom and I think Carla's showed us just what could be done if you are inspired! However, the twist of having student make the questions is perfect. The students are already engaged in the game of Jeopardy, but add to that the fact that students would be waiting for questions that they wrote is genius. I think a teacher would be hard pressed to find a better review tool.

Diane said...

I love what this teacher said toward the end of the lesson regarding some of the best things students learn are what they teach themselves.I agree with this philososphy but the students have to be set up with the right tools to know how to do this and be successful at it. By using a game such as Jeopardy, this teacher provided the perfect tool to enable the students to take ownership of their learning. I think using any sort of game that the students can relate to and have fun with, while learning, is a great tool. Password, Millionare, Wheel of Fortune - all these can be adapted to an classroom learning environment and be very helpful and welcome to the learning process!

gretchen said...

I agree with each of you. Carla's was wonderful last week-- and I have done games like this with good old paper and pen, but the computer makes it flow at a much smoother pace.
as for having kids create, I think it is wonderful. Kids love to feel empowered- especially in their won learning.

Kim said...

I was very impressed with Carla's Jeopardy presentation on Wednesday. It was evident she put lots of effort into creating that review tool for her students. One of my fondest memories of second grade was when our teacher used to create a "Family Fued" game to review classwork (minus the computer of course!). I agree that having the students create the review would give them a sense of ownership over their learning. I tutor a sixth grader whose teacher has the class create quizes for partners. I notice he remembers the answers to his own questions especially.

Jill said...

Jeopardy has a long lasting effect on students, that is for sure! I was telling my husband about Carla's Jeopardy presentation and he told me a very detailed story of his middle school History teacher's awesome Jeopardy games the day before a test... I guess the students would have to study for the Jeopardy game and depending on how well they did during the game, they could earn an additional 10 points on the test the next day... BUT if they did not study and clearly didn't know the answers for the Jeopardy questions, they could also lose up to 10 points for the test. My husband said that everyone got into it and it was so fun that he still remembers it to this day... and he is 37 years old!! So, I guess Jeopardy is the way to go!

Kathy V. said...

I love the idea of students creating the Jeopardy questions and answers! The teacher has created a very organized way for students to be involved, learn and have fun at the same time. I like the idea of having the same teams also. I think deciding on which students go on each team would be critical for the meshing of the team itself. I have had students create various types of questions and answers to be used for review before a test by being split into random teams. Giving students specific topics and allowing them to brainstorm with one another as a team sounds like a much more productive way of learning. Besides creating good questions and answers, working together as a team will have many more positive ripple effects of good social behavior. I have also used review questions generated by the students in a quiz with each student's name next to their question. The students love it and want to know when they can create the next quiz! I definitely will try this with my History class studying ancient Greece. I do feel they will be more successful with their final assessment from preparing and playing the Jeopardy game.

Abbey Sacco said...

I think that using jeopardy is a great teaching tool. I have always wanted to make a jeopardy template on PowerPoint to use for test review. Learning how to use PowerPoint to form a jeopardy template is something I am hoping to learn how to do from this class. One thing that the lesson plan shows was that she has her students form the question to use in the game. I never thought of doing that but it makes so much more sense. I thought I would have to form all the questions but having the students form their own makes the game even more of a review. The lesson plan gave me great ideas for my future classroom.

Shannon N said...

While doing some teaching when I was in my Senior year I actually made up my own jeopardy game to review for a chapter test. Untimately I had wanted to create a powerpoint presentation but I was unsure how or if I even could. So we used note cards and the blackboard. Reading this article and the attached links I can now create my own and continue to use it through out my career. What I also found interesting was just how engaged the students became. Any time you can engage the students is so powerful and I feel the receive more out of it.

Crystal Perham said...

I loved this idea. Currently, I provide students with a jeopardy review. I give my students the questions and have them reply. Carla has made me realize the benfits of students creating the jeopardy game. This is a wonderful way to reinforce content, have students collaborate, and take responsibilty for thier learning. I also liked the fact that the students had to order the questions that they created from simple to complex. This requires students to use their higher order thinking skills. After reading this article, I will no longer make the jeopardy games. I will have my students create them.

Kristen said...

I thought this was a great idea. I have done something similiar in my classroom using the Smartboard. My students absolutely love reviewing this way! They practically beg for Jeopardy review. I usually use it to review Reading vocabulary words. I especially like how the format is provided so we can use it in our own classroom. Very helpful!!

Annie said...

Playing any game in class is something every student would rather do then "actual" work. Having students play Jeoparedy I think is a great way for them to study and learn without them really realizing it. Having students make up the questions is even a better way to play the game. Students will have to really think about what kind of question they will write and what the right answer is. This is a great way for them to be involved in their learning.

Christina said...

This is a great idea that can be utilized in any subject area. I agree with what Diane said that sometimes students learn the best when whey teach themselves. In this case they are learning from one another as well. I can see myself using this idea in my own classroom. It's a great way to review and give students some control over their own learning. They also get exposed to technology which they always enjoy. I especially liked how the children responded and said that they "felt smart." This is what every teacher wants to hear. When a student feels "smart" they also feel empowered. Using a game like Jeopardy is a great way to bring the real world into the classroom. This is a game show that I'm sure they've all seen. One of my teachers used a Jeopardy game as a review for tests and it was always a big hit. Of course at the time we didn't have fancy PowerPoint presentations and we used the chalk board instead. Even still I feel it's a great tool for learning.

Melissa said...

I was happy to read this and see that PowerPoint when used right is a great resouce. I plan on making a game using PowerPoint for class. Carla shows how wonderful this can be. It is a great way to engage students and review at the same time. I only wonder if your far below grade level students are getting as much out of the game as your at and above grade leveled learners?

Liz H. said...

I would defiantly like to learn more about how to make a Jeopardy game on PowerPoint. I love the idea of having students create the questions. This just adds a whole other layer onto their thinking about the concepts that they are learning. Elementary students are so motivated by games. If you can turn anything into a game they become instantly more engaged. To have it be a game with choice, (of category and price)and one that they have seen on TV, is even better. I think it is perfect for a review, but could also be a helpful preassessment tool. You could have students compare their score before and after a unit and feel the satisfaction of all the learning they have accomplished.

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