Thursday, June 6, 2013

Theory Into Practice: Learner-Centered Classrooms

Came across this presentation archived in HaikuDeck, and thought many of the points spoke to how the ideas of theorists translate into using technology in the classroom to create a learner-centered environment. You might recognize the names of such theorists as Alan November and Sr. Kenneth Robinson, who have long promoted that we turn the classroom into a learner-centered, social constructivist setting. If you view the presentation right within the HaikuDeck website by clicking which I recommend, you will also see the speaker's notes to accompany each slide. Here's a direct link to see it there. ED/Tech Brisbane.


http://www.haikudeck.com/p/gxUZzUNZzA/edutech-brisbane-2013

6 comments:

Rachel Bisacky said...

I love the quote from Alan November: "You can have a good school where teachers own the learning. You just can't have a great school."

This really puts the teacher-student relationship into perspective. A teacher can embrace what he or she is teaching and their lessons will be good. However, once the students embrace it as well, those good lessons become great.

Samantha said...

I think the quote "Education is a human process" is a fabulous quote. With all the testing and focus on Common Core Standards in todays schools I think it becomes forgotten that educators and students are human. We have to teach our students the basics and fundamental lessons before we can move on and challenge them more.

Stephanie Scott said...

I loved the quote "publish your failures and learn". In this day and age of technology teachers, peers, and communities can have a huge impact on students just by sharing their person successes and failures. This can all be shared through various technological tools. The sharing of the your life story can be inspiration to the students teachers come across.

Paul Fitzpatrick said...

I like the comment that "Life isn't linear, it's organic. We don't proceed in a straight and orderly course through either life or learning. We tend to move in fits and spurts and, frequently, lesson planning cannot properly account for this progression. Much of how we live and learn comes from our environment and seeps into our being. This is a great way to describe both life and learning.

VIctoria Guerrera said...

I really like Stephanie's comment about learning from people's success and failure. I think it really important for teachers and studnets to share their experiences with eachother. I've learned so much from my friends and teachers sharing their experiences with me.

Tiffany Webley said...

I also agree with Stephanie's comment. I learned to "public" both my successes and especially my failures so that others can learn from my mistakes or be inspired by my success. I've realized that my students love to hear my personal story and they love my openness and honesty.

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