Wednesday, February 27, 2008

Shortchanging Media Literacy


A survey commissioned by Cable in the Classroom (CIC) found that schools are not doing enough to teach media literacy skills and teachers are not being prepared to teach these skills. Read the report on the research findings, and then post your comments. The survey responses are based on a sample of over 1,000 participants, most of whom are classroom teachers, though some were school library-media specialists. The report is 8 pages and filled with charts. You might want to print it to read it more carefully.

What did you learn from reading the report? Did the findings surprise you? Have they in any way changed your attitudes or beliefs about present classroom teaching practices?

Cable in the Classroom Media Literacy Report
http://i.ciconline.org/docs/CICmedialitreport11-2006.pdf

Image from: http://www.library.otis.edu/

1 comment:

mary beth said...

I am skeptical of information coming from a cable network…I looked up Cable in the Classroom’s website and followed a link to Kids, Cable, Learning, and then to a site called Mun2 that was supposed to provide a news special on civics and social justice but all I found was what looks like a television commercial for American Idol, ads for movie recommendations and a survey question about Ricky Martin. I clicked on a podcast and it turned out to be an advertisement for a program in January but the program itself is nowhere to be found. I guess it was on cable in January and I missed it. There are many programs on television that are educational however the cable company is also making money on ads and programs that are more entertaining than educational. This is an example of why teachers have to be aware of the source or sponsor of a website to determine its credibility. That being said, it is also worthwhile for teachers to know what kind of educational programming will be on TV in order to take advantage of timely and relevant programs; pbs.org is an even better source for educational programming.

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